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January 11, 2006

Comments

Marvin

Funnily I only open this dialog to select multiple recipients. Which makes the behavior you describe irritating (Enter works for the first one but not for others). In general, things like this are geared toward very frequent users of an application. While Outlook may have such users, most other software is used *occasionally*. Which means that people don't have time to learn the details of what Enter does on any particular dialog. So they assume that it is equivalent to Ok and would completely miss this feature or decide that Enter behaves erratically.

Konstantin

I think, that in this dialog window it would be quite good to add buttons on which will be written most often chosen e-mail addresses. Than once again to search the same persons under the list, simply enough to press the button.

Konstantin

I think, that in this dialog window it would be quite good to add buttons on which will be written most often chosen e-mail addresses. Than once again to search the same persons under the list, simply enough to press the button.

Hilton

Marvin, did you finish reading the post? And I quote, "The user can type any key but Enter (or Escape, etc.) to start entering a new name, in which case the 'To ->' button becomes the default button again." All you have to do is begin typing another name and the To button is default again. It works ideally for both situations.

Max Howell

This blog is now my current favourite. Great observations and tips for those of us who do ui-development.

Gavin

Personally, I find this behaviour inconsistent and confusing. I now have to mentally keep track of, or look at, the default button before I can press Enter, instead of focussing on the task at hand.

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